Leveling Up, In Character

Leveling Up, In Character

Greetings

This is the first entry in a brand new blog series featured on this site. The goal of this series is to evaluate Races, Classes, BackgroundsEquipment and Spells of 5th edition D&D. This is by no means a novel idea and has been done countless times already. So why do I feel a need to create "Yet-Another-Power-Gaming-Guide"

D&D is first and foremost a role-playing game. So I firmly believe that character design needs to make sense, it needs to present a cohesive character that has a logical place in the setting they are living in. As such, every choice I make when I create and play my character needs to more or less stay in line with the general concept of the character. What this means in practice is that my recommendations in this guide are not always going to be mathematically the best option, but rather the option that is the most fitting for the character while still filling its intended function. Now one thing needs to be made clear at this point and that is that no matter how much sense your character makes, or how strictly you follow the concept, it doesn't mean that the character will survive adventuring or will contribute to the party. That is where i believe these guides of mine are going to be of help- in finding a balance between a role-playing oriented character design and a power-gaming oriented character design. 

My four main criteria for a balanced character design are:

Cohesive character concept
Character that fits the setting and campaign
Ability to survive adventuring
Contribution to the party

The second criteria require a good dialogue with your DM. They are planning your campaign and have a better feel for what character concepts would make sense in their setting. As such, I won't say very much on the second criteria. In the next post i will discuss the first criteria, character concept, and how to make a character more than just their Class and Race.

Yeska †

Yeska †

Pleen

Pleen